Boston Chamber Symphony

Avlana Eisenberg, Music Director

 

The Boston Chamber Symphony is dedicated to performing great works, empowering musicians, and engaging Boston-area audiences. Recent initiatives include the BCS Fellowship Program, which promotes leadership opportunities for emerging artists; the Healing Arts Initiative, which capitalizes on synergies between the healing arts of medicine and music through the performance of orchestral works for hospital staff, patients, and their families; and The Boston Project, which showcases the Boston origins and connections of featured composers and compositions. BCS is actively engaged in growing its artist-audience community, and collaborations range from participation in Boston-area arts festivals to partnership with local food and drink entrepreneurs.

Music Director Avlana Eisenberg has conducted orchestras throughout the United States and in France, Germany, Austria, Scotland, Spain, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Her extensive experience spans the orchestral and operatic repertoire as well as ballet, operetta, and musical theater productions. Eisenberg’s discography includes CD recordings with the Budapest Symphony Orchestra MAV and forthcoming with the Salzburg Chamber Soloists. A frequent guest conductor, she has performed with ensembles at the Edinburgh Festival, the Aspen Music Festival, the Festival at Sandpoint, the Lancaster Festival, and the Eastern Music Festival, and in such venues as the Mozarteum, the Hungarian Radio Hall, and the Granada Theater.

Eisenberg received a Fulbright Fellowship to assist Music Director James Conlon at the Paris National Opera, and she was named one of Glamour magazine’s “Top Ten College Women of the Year.”  While an undergraduate at Yale University, she founded and directed the Silliman Symphony and was honored with Yale’s V. Browne Irish Award for Excellence in the Performing Arts.  Eisenberg holds a Master’s Degree in Orchestral Conducting from the University of Michigan and a Graduate Performance Diploma from the Peabody Institute.